Comments

  1. says

    Hi Joanna

    How about this for a subtitle: (British Crime similar to Martina Cole,Jacqui Rose,Gerry McCullough,Kate Kray,Casey Kelleher,S J Watson,Danielle Ramsay).

    Seems Amazon’s rules are being flouted mercilessly.

    Great interview (as ever).

    Thanks

    Eva

    • says

      Yes, and big publishers are including reviews in the Description as well! Nice subtitle if you can fit it in – although Martina Cole is probably enough :)

  2. LKWatts says

    Hi Joanna,

    Thanks for this interview – it gives the rest of us hope that it usually takes time to be successful and overnight stardom very rarely happens. I’ve been writing seriously now for the past three years and my second book is almost ready to be published. I’ve also raised the price of my first book, so it’s now just a question of being brave and seeing what happens.

    • says

      The overnight stars have been plugging away for years generally. I love that Amanda Hocking had been writing for 12 years or something similar when she became an overnight success – after 9 books! I’ll look forward to being an overnight success in a few years time – see you there?!

  3. says

    Hi Joanna,
    I am one of you invisible followers. Since I am experimenting with Indie publishing, I have found you interviews very helpful. In fact I might start doing some myself!
    This was very helpful as marketing is the hard part for me.
    This blurb thing and stuff. All of that….
    Cheers,
    Alyne

    • says

      Hi Alyne, Thanks so much for becoming more visible by leaving a comment! Lurking is utterly fine with me, but I do love to have some interaction on the blog, so welcome!
      Marketing is hard at first – but just think of it as connecting with people who are interested in the same things you are. Sharing what you love with other enthusiastic people who want to hear about them. It’s not spammy, it’s sharing.

  4. says

    I got an agent after several months, but 2 years later, she’s still waiting to hear back from some of the big publishers. I’m about to indie publish a YA magical realism novella which was too short and too different to even consider going the traditional route, but what do you advise doing with my novel? Should I go indie with it too. I’m so sick of waiting.

      • says

        I figure I’ll see how my novella goes. If it sells well I can be confident the novel will too. If it doesn’t, I’ll keep traipsing through the publishers with the novel for a bit longer.

  5. Christopher says

    The information I found most interesting here was that he re-wrote his book description and sales doubled… I find that the most mysterious and perhaps important key to sales, but there is little information on it anywhere. How to write the book description that draws the reader in. Perhaps it is is like the book itself; something that one slaves away at and if lightening strikes, all goes well.

  6. says

    I wrote about 10 book descriptions for’ ‘Mara’ and I’m still not sure. I think trad publishers sit in a group around a table for days to create good cover copy. Us Indies seem stuck doing it alone. Its hard to get feedback on book blurbs I’ve found.
    You need to think like a copy writer and use key words and stuff. Target a certain type of reader.
    :)

  7. says

    Hi Joanna, most interesting, I have signed up for your newsletter.
    I enjoyed the Mark Edwards interview, and am considering rewriting my blurb.
    I did the keywords search on Amazon, but not the Google one, so I will go back
    and do that, & see what happens.
    I’ve sold 1 copy on Kindle in about 4 months! And 6 hard copies of my non-fiction book, part channels, part travelogue. Title might be too long? However, I wanted to go with it:
    Temple of the Sun & Moon, Book 1: The Water Speaks. Working on Book 2 now.
    Good luck in all that you do, Joanna! Thank you, Ann.

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